Products / Efficiency Legislation

Efficiency Legislation - Outdoor Lighting

Metal halide luminaires manufactured on or after January 1, 2010 and sold in the State of California are required to meet the requirements of the updated version of California Title 20. The updated version takes Title 20 beyond the requirements of the federal Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). Title 20 now is generally more restrictive. Luminaires that are EISA compliant may not comply with the new version of California Title 20.

The applicable provisions of the new version of California Title 20 is linked here:

California Title 20, Excerpt from Section 1605.3(n)

(2) Energy Efficiency Standard for Metal Halide Luminaires. Metal halide luminaires rated at least partially within the range of 150 to500 watts shall not have probe-start ballasts and shall comply with Section 1605.3(n)(2)(A) as applicable:

(A) The requirements for metal halide luminaires are as follows:

1.
Indoor metal halide luminaires manufactured on or after January 1, 2010 shall comply with at least one compliance option of Section 1605.3(n)(2)(B).
2.
Indoor metal halide luminaires manufactured on or after January 1, 2015 shall comply with Section 1605.3(n)(2)(B)4,and shall also comply with at least one other compliance option of Section 1605.3(n)(2)(B).
3.
Outdoor metal halide luminaires manufactured on or after January 1, 2010, may complywith Section 1605.3(n)(2)(B)3, and shall comply with at least one other compliance option of Section 1605.3(n)(2)(B).

(B) Metal halide luminaires shall meet one of the following compliance options:

1.
A minimum ballast efficiency of:
i. 90 percent for 150 to 250 watt lamps.
ii. 92 percent for 251 to 500 watt lamps.
2.
A minimum ballast efficiency of 88 percent and an occupant sensor which is an integral control as defined in Section 1602(n) of this Article, shipped with the factory default setting to automatically reduce lamp power through dimming by a minimum of 40 percent within 30 minutes or less after the area has been vacated.
3.
A minimum ballast efficiency of 88 percent and have an automatic daylight control which is an integral control as defined in Section 1602(n) of this Article, shipped with the factory default setting to automatically reduce lamp power through dimming by a minimum of 40 percent.
4.
A minimum ballast efficiency of 88 percent and a relamping rated wattage within only one of the four wattage bins specified in subsections (i) through(iv) below. The luminaire shall be able to operate lamps within only one of the four wattage bins and shall not be rated for any lamp wattage outside of that wattage bin. The luminaire shall have a permanent, pre-printed factory-installed label that states the relamping rated wattage.
i. 150-160 watts; or
ii. 200-215 watts; or
iii. 290-335 watts; or
iv. 336-500 watts, provided that when a luminaire is able to operate 336 to 500 watt lamps, the luminaire shall be prepackaged and sold together with at least one lamp per socket, having a minimum lamp mean efficacy of 80 lumens per watt based on published mean lumens and rated lamp power (watts).

EXCEPTIONS to Sections 1605.3(n)(2)

The following metal halide lighting systems shall not have probe-start ballasts and are not required to meet the minimum ballast efficiency requirements:
1.
Luminaires that use regulated lag ballasts;
2.
Luminaires that use electronic ballasts which operate at 480 volts; or
3.
Luminaires that meet all three of the following requirements:
a. Are rated for use only with 150 watt lamps, and
b. Are rated for use in wet locations, as specified by the National Electrical Code 2002, Section 410.4(A); and
c. Contain a ballast that is rated to operate at ambient air temperatures above 50 degrees C, as specified by UL 1029-2001.

Applicable Definitions from Section 1602(n)

“Automatic daylight control” is a control that automatically reduces lighting in response to available daylight. This control typically uses photosensors to detect changes in daylight illumination and then change the electric lighting level in response to the daylight changes. “Integral control” means an fully functional occupancy sensor or automatic daylight control system for which all required components for an integral control, including control devices, sensors, and wiring, are factory installed, packaged and sold with each individual luminaire, and are integrated into each individual luminaire at the factory in one of the following three methods:
1.
Is integrated directly into the luminaire housing and hardwired to the lighting system; or
2.
Is pre-wired to allow proper functionality between the control and luminaire, and to allow remote mounting of the control.One end of the wiring shall be pre-wired to the luminaire, and the other end shall be prewired to the control. The wiring may be either a metal or fiber conductor. The wiring may allow temporary disconnection in the field to allow remote mounting of the control; or
3.
Is pre-wired with a wireless radio controlled sensor to allow proper functionality between the control and luminaire, and toallow interaction with the wireless control signal in the lighting system.

Note: Information on the updated version of California Title 20 is provided as a courtesy by Philips Lumec. It should not be considered definitive. Agent Representatives, Specifiers, Owners, Users and other interested parties are responsible for securing definitive information on California Title 20, as well as other legislation or regulations that may apply.